Hermosa Lodge logo
banner


Local Attractions

Long Island Wines Restaurant Reviews
Cigar Bars Book Stores Speciality Food Stores
Historical Attractions Spas Movie Theaters
Museums Gyms  
local attractions    
Restaurant Reviews
restaurantsBack To Top

75 Main Street
Phone: 631 283 7575
First they build a beautiful mediterranean restaurant, then they clutter it with 'Sports TVs'. Go figure.
631 283 7575


Barrister's

Phone: 631 283 6206
Let us not forget the humble hamburger. Good food. Great for lunch. No big deal. 631 283 6206


Basilico
Phone: 631 283 7987
Lovely. Minimal but elegant. Recommended. 631 283 7987


John Duck's

Phone: 631 283 0311
This place has a kind of '50s atmosphere since it hasn't been updated since then. But the food is good, the steaks and chops are great......and you'll love the prices. 631 283 0311


The Driver's Seat

Phone: 631 283 6606
Just a local stop. Hamburgers, et cetera. But be alert; that guy at the next booth might be a billionaire. It happens. 631 283 6606


La Parmigiana

Phone: 631 283 8030
Pizza to stay or go. Meatballs and spaghetti. Family atmosphere. I like this place. 631 283 8030


Red Bar Brasserie

Phone: 631 283 0704
Very very. Just how 'in' do we want to get? Tiny bar; small restaurant. Very trendy. Is this a good thing? You tell me. 631 283 0704


Silver's Famous

Phone: 631 283 6443
My only question; famous for what? It's simple and it's been there a thousand years. Really just a good lunch place. 631 283 6443


Robert's

Phone: 631 726 7171
You'll love the building, the decor (country french), the ambience, the food. One of the better restaurants in the hamptons. But don't drop your fork because this place is serious. Reserve in advance.
631 726 7171


Old Stove Pub

Phone: 631 537 3300
Steak. Plain. In an old house.
Very much the hamptons before they were 'famous'. Been there for years. I love it. 631 537 3300


Cafe Max

Phone: 631 324 2004
Small. small. Seafood cuisine. Very small (or did I say that?) Has its fans. 631 324 2004


Della Femina

Phone: 631 329 6666
Definitely see and be seen. Sophisticated. You'll pay for it.........and wait for the privilege. 631 329 6666


The Grill

Phone: 631 324 6300
Basic food, in the center of East Hampton. Simple and nice, indoors and out. No big deal.......but a nice spot if you're in the vicinity. 631 324 6300


The Laundry

Phone: 631 324 3199
Once was a laundromat.....long time ago, but you'd never know it. And certainly not from the prices.
Warm and cosy, even though it's not small. 631 324 3199


Nick and Toni's

Phone: 631 324 3550
In with the 'in crowd'. Very very. A beautiful place. 631 324 3550


The Palm at Hunting Inn

Phone: 631 324 0411
A bit falling down. Bad lighting. Is one Palm like the next? You tell me. 631 324 0411


Mount Fuji

Phone: 631 267 7600
Japanese. The best out here. In a simple and plain environment. 631 267 7600


95 School Street

Phone: 631 537 7100
Good. Crowded bar. Maybe thinking it's a little more than it is. But what's wrong with ambition? 631 537 7100


Alison by The Beach

Phone: 631 537 7100
One of my favorites. Country french. Cozy. It's hip but not pretentious. 631 537 7100


Bobby Van's

Phone: 631 537 0590
Celebrated local bistro. Goes way back. Active bar. Lately, awfully pricey......but that's only my opinion.
631 537 0590


World Pie

Phone: 631 537 7999
Wood burning pizza. Also good Italian. Active bar. A big success. Indoors and out. We go there a lot. 631 537 7999


The American Hotel

Phone: 631 725 3535
100 years old. At the very least, you've got to go for drinks. Dinner is great too. And you can play backgammon in the hotels main room. Reservations are a must. 631 725 3535


Serafina

Phone: 631 725 0101
Small and cozy. We go back. 631 725 0101


Paradise

Phone: 631 725 6080
Out front a bookstore, then a bar, then a restaurant behind that. We love it. 631 725 6080


Savanna's

Phone: 631 283 0202
Across the street from the Southampton railroad station. They try hard to please and make it a hit. You be the judge. 631 283 0202


The Lobster Inn

Phone: 631 283 1525
Lobster for the masses. 631 283 1525


Shippy's

Phone: 631 283 0007
Not chic. Very local. The food is damn good......and it's cosy in winter. Right in the center of Southampton.
631 283 0007


B Smith's Restaurant

Phone: 631 725 1934
Right on the pier in Sag Harbor, at the foot of the village. The food is good; my only problem is that it's very big. But you won't regret a visit. 631 725 1934


Mirko's Restaurant

Phone: 631 726 4444
Very lovely. Excellent cuisine. Small and quiet. And right in the center of Watermill. 631 726 4444


The Golden Pear

In Bridgehampton, Southampton, East Hampton. Not a restaurant, so much as breakfast/lunch stop. We go every morning for breakfast. Great coffee; memorable croissants.


James Lane Cafe

Phone: 631 324 7100
At the Hedges Inn, in East Hampton. Wonderful dining and catered events. 631 324 7100


Sen
Phone: 631 725 1774
The best sushi and sashimi bar on the East End? You be the judge.


Armand's

Phone: 631 283 9742
Armand's got a big play this past summer. Very 'in' with the 'in' crowd. Its decor is simple and plain; its copper bar attractive. AND it is just down the street from Hermosa Lodge. We go back.


Loaves and Fishes

Phone: 631 537 0555
Proving that you CAN fool some of the people all of the time, this place is so expensive as to make a joke of anyone who would pay their prices. Not for me.


Station
Phone: 631 726 7560
Can it be true? This place has had more 'comebacks' than Lisa Minnelli (which is an appropriate remark, since the rumor is that it's filled with pretty boys). We really haven't been there........but we're working on it. The idea of taking a small train station and turning it into a bar and restaurant was brilliant.


historicalBack To Top

Custom House Museum
631-692-4664
Main Street & Garden Street, Sag Harbor
The 18th-century home to Henry Packer Dering, the first custom master of Sag Harbor, the Custom House features a collection of decorative arts and local furniture from Sag Harbor families, including the Derings. The museum is operated by the society for the Preservation of Long Island Antiques. Hours vary; $3.00 for adults, $1.50 for children and senior citizens.
631 692 4664



Third House

631-668-5340
Montauk Highway, Montauk
Built in 1749, Third House was the final house built for the summer cattle tenders. Its most famous resident was Teddy Roosevelt who, with his Rough Riders, stayed there in 1898 on the way home from the Spanish-American War. On the grounds of Third House is the Pharaoh Museum, which contains family artifacts from the last of the Montauk tribe. Archeological tools are also on display. Open Friday - Monday; admission is free.
Mulford Farm
631-324-6850



10 James Lane
East Hampton
This living history of 18th century village life is operated by the East Hampton Historical Society and features costumed attendants reenacting colonial farm life in an 18th century English Barn. Visitors can enjoy display of local history, historic children's games, decorative arts exhibits and the award-winning period garden, Rachel's Garden, where plants, herbs and vegetables grow from heirloom seeds. Open weekends in June, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p. m.; open daily in July - August, 1:00 p.m.; $2.00 for adults; $1.00 for children; $1.50 for senior citizens.
Home Sweet Home Museum
631-324-0713



14 James Lane
East Hampton
Built in 1680, the Home Sweet Home Museum was the childhood home of John Howard Payne, America's first actor and author of the famous poem and song "Home Sweet Home." The museum contains collections of ceramics and furniture dating from 1640 to 1870. The grounds sport an 1804 Pantigo Windmill and gardens. Open daily; $4.00 per person. Guided tours only.


St. Andrew's Dune Church

Dune Road
The church is a must see. Originally built on the beach in Southampton in 1851 as a Life Saving Station, the building was converted into a church in 1879. Set in the dunes, facing the ocean, this church is a beauty, with Sunday services each Sunday during the summer. Relics of off-shore shipwrecks can be seen on the grounds.



Halsey Homestead

To be found on Main Street in Southampton, the homestead is the oldest English type 'saltbox' house in New York State. This property dates back to the founding of Southampton more than 350 years ago.


Montauk Lighthouse

631-668-2544
2000 Montauk Highway, Montauk
The Montauk Lighthouse was authorized by the Second Congress of the United States and President George Washington, making it the first lighthouse in the State of New York. Built in 1796, the lighthouse is still an active aid in Navigation, automated by the U.S. Coast Guard in 1987. Under the care of the Montauk Historical Society, visitors to the lighthouse can view the history of the terrain of the lighthouse as well as historical photos, reconstructed keepers quarters, maps and documents pertaining to the lighthouse's history, as well as the work done to save the lighthouse from erosion. Visitors can explore the lighthouse in five languages: English, French, Spanish, German, and Japanese.Call for hours; $4.00 for adults; $2.50 for children; $3.50 for senior citizens.



Conscience Point
North Sea Harbor
Conscience Point is the site of the landing, in 1640, of the English from Massachusetts, who founded Southampton. It is the first English settlement in New York State.



The Rogers Memorial Library

Jobs Lane, Southampton
In 1892, the library was formed at the bequest of Mrs. Rogers, who left her house and the princely sum of $10,000.00 (in 1892) for the purpose of establishing a library. This celebrated institution has contributed much to the education and pleasure of the village ever since. It has an impressive book collection, online services, children's reading programs and a reading club. 631-283-0774.



The Parrish Art Museum

Jobs Lane, Southampton
In 1897, a popular summer resident, Samuel Parrish, purchased the land next door to the new library and commissioned architect Grosvenor Atterbury to erect a museum to house his collection. The museum is a delight to the eye and the home to a series of touring exhibits. You'll love it. 631-283-2118.



The Southampton Historical Museum

Meeting House Lane, Southampton
On the site of the original farmland granted to William Rogers in 1643, The museum holds Colonial relics dating back to 1640 and the Indian room contains artifacts from the Shinnecock and Montauk Indian tribes. The Old Schoolhouse is one of the oldest one-room schoolhouses in America. The museum also contains a collection of whaling implements, blacksmith shop, cobbler's shop and carpenter's shop. The Country Store is set in a pre-revolutionary barn where the British stabled horses during the Revolutionary war. Open June to September.



Museums
museumBack To Top


Water Mill Museum
631-726-4625
Old Mill Rd., Water Mill
The museum is located in the original mill built in 1727. Unlike most East End windmills, the mill is a waterwheel mill and is the oldest operational mill on Long Island. Visitors observe the working wood gears, shafts and restored wheel as well as blacksmith, carpenters', farmers', weavers', spinners', and millers' tools. Cornmeal ground on premises is also available. Open daily; $2.00 for adults, $1.50 for senior citizens, children are free.



Old Halsey Homestead Museum (Halsey House)

631-283-3527
189 South Main Street, SouthamptonOperated by the Southampton Colonial Society, Halsey House is the oldest frame house in New York State. Built in 1648, it is the former home of one of Southampton's original settlers, Thomas Halsey. The house has been restored and furnished to resemble 17th century Southampton. The grounds include a colonial herb garden. Open Tuesday - Sunday; $2.00 for adults, $.50 cents for children under 12.



Sag Harbor Whaling Museum

631-725-0770
Main Street, Sag Harbor
Designed for Benjamin Huntting in 1845 by Minard Lefever (who also designed the Whaler's Church), the Greek revival mansion is home to the Sag Harbor Historical Museum. Visitors enter through the jaws of a right whale into history of Sag Harbor's whaling days. Ship models, whaling artifacts, period furniture, toys and china dolls and scrimshaw are all on display. Open daily; $3.00 for adults, $1.00 for children, $2.00 for senior citizens.



Custom House Museum
631-725-00250
Main Street & Garden Street, Sag Harbor
The 18th-century home to Henry Packer Dering, the first custom master of Sag Harbor, the Custom House features a collection of decorative arts and local furniture from Sag Harbor families, including the Derings. The museum is operated by the society for the Preservation of Long Island Antiques. Hours vary; $3.00 for adults, $1.50 for children and senior citizens.



Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center

631-324-4929
830 Fireplace Road, East Hampton
Abstract expressionist Jackson Pollock and his wife, artist Lee Krasner, moved to 1 1/4 acres in the Springs in 1945 and Pollack did the bulk of his work in the studio. Operated by the Stony Brook Foundation, Inc., a nonprofit affiliate of the University at Stony Brook, the Pollack Krasner house is a study center dedicated to promoting scholarship in 20th-century American art as well as a vestige of Pollock and Krasner's life together. The highlight of the museum is the studio's paint-laden floor - an unintentional work of art. Open Thursday - Saturday; $5.00 donation. Guided tours by appointment only.



Mulford Farm

631-324-6850
10 James Lane, East Hampton
This living history of 18th century village life is operated by the East Hampton Historical Society and features costumed attendants reenacting colonial farm life in an 18th century English Barn. Visitors can enjoy display of local history, historic children's games, decorative arts exhibits and the award-winning period garden, Rachel's Garden, where plants, herbs and vegetables grow from heirloom seeds. Open weekends in June, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p. m.; open daily in July - August, 1:00 p.m.; $2.00 for adults; $1.00 for children; $1.50 for senior citizens.



Long House Reserve

631-329-3568
133 Hands Creek Road, East Hampton
Jack Lenor Larson, textile designer and philanthropist, wanted people to experience the visual arts in "full round" and created Long House as a place where visual arts, music and dance could be viewed as such. Sponsored by the Long House Foundation, there are also workshops, seminars and tours. Hours of operation and price vary with each event.



Home Sweet Home Museum

631-324-0713
14 James Lane, East Hampton
Built in 1680, the Home Sweet Home Museum was the childhood home of John Howard Payne, America's first actor and author of the famous poem and song "Home Sweet Home." The museum contains collections of ceramics and furniture dating from 1640 to 1870. The grounds sport an 1804 Pantigo Windmill and gardens. Open daily; $4.00 per person. Guided tours only.



Guild Hall

631-324-0806
158 Main Street, East Hampton
Guild Hall is more than just a museum, it is a Hamptons institution. With three galleries, Guild Hall truly promotes all the arts in the Hamptons. Open for over 60 years, the museum has consistently been a supporter of the local community and its artists - not without its share of controversy. Hours vary; $2.00 suggested donation.



The Clinton Academy

631-324-6850
151 Main Street, East
Established in 1784, the Academy was the first secondary school in New York State. It now houses more than 12,000 articles related to East Hampton history, including clothing, textiles, photographs, books, ceramics and furniture. Open daily 1:00 p.m.- 2:00 p.m.; $2.00 for adults, $1.00 for students and senior citizens.



The Southampton Historical Museum

Meeting House Lane, Southampton
On the site of the original farmland granted to William Rogers in 1643, The museum holds Colonial relics dating back to 1640 and the Indian room contains artifacts from the Shinnecock and Montauk Indian tribes. The Old Schoolhouse is one of the oldest one-room schoolhouses in America. The museum also contains a collection of whaling implements, blacksmith shop, cobbler's shop and carpenter's shop. The Country Store is set in a pre-revolutionary barn where the British stabled horses during the Revolutionary war. Open June to September.



The Parrish Art Museum

631-283-2118
Jobs Lane, Southampton
In 1897, a popular summer resident, Samuel Parrish, purchased the land next door to the new library and commissioned architect Grosvenor Atterbury to erect a museum to house his collection. The museum is a delight to the eye and the home to a series of touring exhibits. You'll love it.



East Hampton Town Marine Museum
Bluff Road, Amagansett 631-267-6544
Operated by the Hampton Historical Society, the museum is dedicated to the history of the whaling and fishing in the Hamptons. Boats, tools, equipment and dioramas convey the difficulty and struggles East End fishing presents the Baymen. There is also a series of displays dedicated to East End hunting. Open daily, $2.00 for adults, $1.00 for students and senior citizens.



Book Stores
book storeBack To Top

BookHampton
East Hampton
20 East Main Street, East Hampton 631-324-4939
Browsing through BookHampton is a true summer moment. This bibliophile's resort (under new ownership but not to worry, the store will remain the same) covers every category in print, and Barnes & Noble can't compete with the local devotion and feel. Along with an impressive selection of books and the audio/video section, the store also holds author signings and readings. Take care as you lose yourself in this charming book spot, you may even give away that movie ticket.



Canio's Books

Sag Harbor
490 Main Street, Sag Harbor 631-725-4926
Alongside the current bestsellers, you might find that out-of-print book you've been searching for. On Saturday at 6:00 p.m. attend a book siging or poetry reading.



BookHampton South

Southampton
93 Main Street, Southampton 631-283-0270
Same great store but for the Southampton set.



The Book Mark

Westhampton Beach
130 Main Street, Westhampton Beach 631-288-2120
Another great bookstore for the whole family. Aside from a selection of hardcovers and paperbacks, The Book Mark features children's literature, including the classics.




spasBack To Top

Naturopathica
631-329-2525
74 Montauk Highway,
East Hampton
Open year-round 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. every day but Tuesday and Thursday
Rejuvinate yourself with a Naturopathica massage. Choose from intuitive touch massage, reflexology, Polarity therapy, cranio-sacral treatment, a relaxing treatment at which a massage therapist stretches out your entire body. By appointment.



Susan Ciminelli Day Spa

631-267-6300
43 Pantigo Road,
East Hampton
Open year-round Tuesday - Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
The Susan Ciminelli Day Spa offers an array of services using only the finest botanicals, exotic essential oils and natural seaweed. One of the most invigorating services is the mineral salt scrub - it exfoliates and stimulates. The Shiatsu massage is a painless, relaxing way to balance your energy for the weekend. Appointments are suggested.




gymBack To Top


Omnihealth and Raquet Club
631-283-4770
395 County Road, Southampton
Conveniently located at the Southampton Jitney stop, the Omni is a full-service health club featuring fitness classes, the finest equipment, two pools, sauna, steam room and jacuzzi. There are also spinning classes and raquetball courts.



American Fitness Factory

631-283-0707
15 Hill Street, Southampton
Open Monday - Friday 6:00 am - 10:00 pm
Saturday 7:00 am - 9:00 pm
Sunday 8:00 am - 8:00 pm
The American Fitness Factory carries a full line of Cybex equipment, Star Track cardiovascular machines and free weights. For those who took the winter off from the gym, you may want to consider signing up for the 'Bikini Boot Camp'.



New Body Fitness and Aquatic Training
631-725-8420
52 Main Street, Sag Harbor
By Appointment
Work out in your own pool with Paul Gabbert, a certified fitness trainer, water safety instructor and member of the American Aquatic Association. He'll help you with weight loss, fat burning, stress reduction, cross training, circulation improvement and more.


World Gym

631-723-3174
250 West Montauk Highway, Hampton Bays
Open Monday - Friday 6:00 am - 10:00 pm.
Saturday 7:00 am - 8:00 pm
Sunday 7:00 am - 6:00 pm
World Gym is a complete fitness facility with extensive aerobic classes and a complete line of Cybex circuit equipment to keep you finely tuned.



Hampton Tennis and Fitness Club

631-653-6767
Route 104, East Quogue
Open Monday - Friday 5:00 am - 10:00 pm.
Saturday and Sunday 7:00 am - 9:00 pm.
Hampton Tennis and Fitness offers both indoor and outdoor tennis, pool, sauna, over 70 exercise stations, free weights, racquetball, volleyball, aerobics classes and children's programs.



East Hampton Gym

631-324-4499
2 Fithian Lane
Open year round
Monday - Friday 6:00 am - 9:30 pm.
Saturday 7:00 am - 8:00 pm.
Sunday 7:00 am - 5:30 pm.
The East Hampton Gym is a full-service facility. There are treadmills, Stairmasters, bicycles, versiclimbers and a Cybex circuit system. Free weights and private training are also available. Shower facilities, a sauna and a tanning room round out this facility's services.



Conservatory of Dance Arts

631-537-1684
Main Street, Bridghampton
Not just a dancing school. Stretch, tone, sculpt and strengthening classes are offered daily except Thursday. Classes in ballet, jazz, modern, tap, and ballroom/swing are also available.



Body Tech

631-267-8222
249 Main Street, Amagansett
Open Monday - Friday 6:30 am - 9:00 pm.
Saturday 7:30 am - 7:00 pm.
Sunday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm.
An extensive selection of cardiovascular equipment, including no-joint-stress "transport" and a Tectrix Virtual Reality Bike. Free weights, Cybex and trainers are also available.

Baraka
212-255-0067
By appointment only.
Do you like to work out but don't want to waste precious daylight in the gym? Then Baraka is for you. They specialize in natural training, working with clients in outdoor environments such as the East Hampton High School track, local beaches and parks and Central Park in New York City.



food storesBack To Top

Village Cheese and Gormet Shop
631-283-6949
11 Main Street, Southampton
There will probably be a wait to order cheese and other deli treats - but with the array of choices it'll be worth it. Stop here before the beach for great sandwiches.



Espresso

631-725-4433
184 Division Street, Sag Harbor
Just off the beaten path, Espresso is a great place to get Italian specialty products. Look for focaccia bread, olive oil, fresh pasta and more.



Sagaponack Main Store

542 Sagg Main Street, Sagaponack
Located in an old, white, clapboard building, this main store is a good old-fashioned place to grab a cup of coffee, a muffin and the newspaper in the morning. Who knows? You may run into Tom Wolfe, Kurt Vonnegut or even a Kennedy or two while you're there.



Loaves and Fishes
631-537-3696
50 Main Street, Sagaponack
Sometimes called 'Loans and Finances', this place ain't cheap.Run by a mother/ daughter team, this shop features everything from freshly baked bread to unique soups to serve at your dinner party.



Dreesen's Excelsior Market

631-324-0456
33 Newtown Lane, East Hampton
Dreesen's brings their prime meats, seafood, BBQ, produce and most importantly, doughnuts, off-premises.



Barefoot Contessa

631-324-0240
46 Newtown Lane, East Hampton
When I die, I want to go to the Barefoot Contessa as my reward for a good life. This shop is a joy just to stop in and experience the ambience of gourmet take-out food and sweets that might be worth murdering for: Ginger chicken, perfect pesto and baked fruit tarts are the perfect accompaniment to a day by the pool with friends.



Razzano's
631-537-7288
Bridghampton Commons, Bridgehampton
When watching your waistline isn't of importance, Razzano's is another market with all kinds of Italian goodies to make you smile: cookies, cakes, breads, cheese, coffee beans, pizza, pasta, sausages, among many other sinful delicacies.



moviesBack To Top



Multiplex United Artists
631-287-2774
43 Hill Street

Sag Harbor Cinema
631-725-0010
Main Street

Fiveplex United Artists
631-324-0448
30 Main Street



Cigar Bars
cigar barsBack To Top

American Hotel
631-725-3535
Main Street, Sag Harbor

The Cigar Bar
631-725-2575
Main Street, Sag Harbor

The Living Room at Sam's Hampton Cafe'
631-288-9114
Westhampton



cream pixel cream pixel 

tan grapes

The first grapes planted on Long Island were during colonial times. Hybrid varietals thrived but Vinifera (fine wine making grapes) from the old world were susceptable to disease. In 1973, Alex and Louisa Harrgrave planted vinifera on the North Fork and began what is now a thriving wine region producing world class wines. Three wineries are within a few miles of the Hermosa Lodge and dozens more are just a ferry ride further on the North Fork.

lobster

In addition to fish and lobsters, shellfish have been a valuable part of the Long Island fisheries. The simplest to catch and the most popular is the clam, which comes in two varieties, hardshell and softshell. Not counting "treading" for clams with your toes, the only equipment you need is a clam rake.

 

windmill

Windmills on Long Island were widely used for producing flour and meal. Both water mills and windmills were geared to saw native timber in the days when the local supply was use for building. Thus the name of the village of Watermill.

hand

Walt Whitman, one of the greatest American poets, was born in 1819 on Long Island. Much of the imagery in Whitman's poems is drawn from his experiences on eastern Long Island. He adopted the Native American name for Long Island, "Paumanok," in his collection, Leaves of Grass.


potato

The soil and climate on the East End were congenial to the potato, tested by progressive farmers in the 1840s. By 1875, it had become a favored money crop for many farmers. Production was greatly encouraged by the late nineteenth-century development of machines for digging ad planting potatoes. The famous Long Island potato is still Suffolk County's most important vegetable crop.

ducks

Long island Duckling had its beginning in 1873, when a New York merchant, visiting China, was impressed by some of the white ducks he saw near Peking. He arranged to bring 25 back to the united States. 16 died en route, 5 were eaten, and 4 multiplied rapidly and the rest is history.

bikes

Bicycling became more popular at the turn of the century, and bicycling clubs sprang up all over Long Island. The Long Island Rail Road added bicycle racks to passenger cars in 1899. "Mile a Minute Murphy" was clocked at 61mph riding on planks laid on the rail road tracks behind a specially modified Long Island Rail Road train that same year. For a more leisurely ride, Hermosa Lodge has bicycles for you to use during your stay.

planes

Long Island was in the forefront of military aviation in WWI. Noted aviation pioneers constructed and tested many early sea planes for the military on Great South Bay in the early 1900s.


about
  rooms    concierge   photo gallery   local attractions   directions   contact us

Hermosa Lodge
78 Mecox Road, Water Mill, New York 11976
For Reservations: 774-893-3262

innkeeper@hermosalodge.com
Hermosa Lodge